Archive | April, 2013

Celebrate First Downs, Too!

10 Apr

The indictments of 35 former Atlanta educators, including former Superintendent Dr. Beverly Hall, have raised our collective ire once again at the harm done to children by their actions, but before we replace the smart looking “A” in the system’s logo with a scarlet letter, let’s not overlook what is hidden in plain sight. Most educators did not cheat.

This may seem little consolation at first glance, but we’d be fools to overlook this. We have a choice. We can stigmatize the 95 percent of educators that didn’t cheat and the entire school district because of the 5 percent that did, or we can build on this good news. The district has already taken important steps to ensure integrity and higher ethics, though there may be more it can do.

So, back to those educators who did not cheat. What shall we say about them or to them? We might simply acknowledge their honesty, integrity, and dedication in helping children learn in the face of education policy roulette. If all we discuss is what is wrong, we miss an opportunity to acknowledge and celebrate the small wins we need to motivate educators to stay in the game and to win.

We can and should leverage this legitimate good news to reframe the dialogue from what’s wrong with APS to what’s right and to consider how we routinely use good news to breed energy and success into our district. If nothing has been taken to show appreciation for the contributions of educators who have continued to educate children against the backdrop of this ongoing investigation, something should be done to recognize their engagement beyond the check they receive every two weeks.

Most of us know more about APS’ failings than we do of real accomplishments. Here are a few good things I’m aware of as someone who pays attention to APS, but the general public doesn’t know about this, or other good stuff, because no one talks about it. And that’s got to change. For example, per CNN, Parkside Elementary School students won the 2012 Robotics Competition and an APS teacher was selected as a Georgia Teacher of the Year finalist.

Taking time to celebrate and congratulate people for moving things forward can drive greater productivity and performance in APS. After all, educators, like employees in other industries need a sense of accomplishment to keep them engaged and inspired to come to work each day.

Engagement is highly correlated to productivity and performance – – you know, those test scores and graduation rates we’re after. The 2012 Gallop Q12 survey found that over 70% of 1.5 million North American workers are either underperforming or sabotaging the work of their company and co-workers because they are either not engaged or actively disengaged. Instead of pressuring educators to perform, our students might fare better in school districts that know how to motivate educators to do what they already want to do.

Acknowledging and celebrating small wins can go along way to rebuild morale and deepen engagement and satisfaction that can yield greater success for more children. It can also restore public confidence and desperately needed hope that Atlanta’s children are being prepared to do great things. What we celebrate puts the culture of an organization on display.

Celebrating first downs – – each play that steadily advances the ball down the field is essential. Celebrations are the shared experiences that can keep people motivated and invested in achieving the ultimate goal. Educating children is inherently meaningful work. If Southwest Airlines can make its employees feel good about air travel and if Starbucks can make its employees feel good about selling coffee, then APS should have little difficulty making educators feel good about an even higher purpose – – educating our children.

When we simply drill people about performance without pausing to celebrate small victories, we wear them out. Weary people lose hope and without hope, some people lose their way.

Etienne R. LeGrand is an education strategist, co-founder and CEO of the W.E.B. Du Bois Society.